Nova Health Partners with Your Care in Redmond, OR

Expands Service Capabilities to Central Oregon

Eugene, OR – November 20, 2021 – Nova Health, a provider of high-quality, convenient primary and urgent care services in the Western United States, has partnered with Your Care, an urgent care clinic in Redmond, Oregon. Your Care provides a wide range of services to treat non-life-threatening injuries and illnesses for same-day and walk-in patients.  

 According to Community Care Partners Chief Executive Officer Jim Ashby, the acquisition of Your Care exemplifies Nova Health’s goal to provide high quality care throughout Oregon and the Western United States.   

“Nova Health began in 2008 with one clinic and nine employees in Eugene, OR,” said Ashby. “Today Nova Health, along with SouthStar Urgent Care, is part of Community Care Partners, a leading provider of urgent and primary care in 60 clinics across Oregon, Washington, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and Louisiana.  We remain committed to serving patients throughout Oregon as evidenced by our Your Care partnership.”   

Debora Wattenburg, co-founder of Your Care and now part of the operations team at Nova Health, says the partnership with Nova Health was the logical next step for Your Care. 

“We are thrilled to now be part of the Nova Health team.  I can say with confidence that joining Nova Health and the Community Care Partners family has set up the Your Care team members and the community of Redmond for long term success.”  

“Nova Health and Your Care share the same vision for compassionate patient care across both urgent care and occupational medicine,” added co-founder Dr. Eric Wattenburg. “I want our patients to know they should continue to expect the same care from the same providers they’ve come to know at Your Care. As part of Nova Health, we will continue to serve our patients, and they will benefit from our transition to Nova Health.” 

About Nova Health  
Nova Health provides high-quality, convenient, primary and urgent care services. Established in 2008 with one clinic and nine employees, it has grown to 30 clinics in the Western United States.   

About Community Care Partners 
Community Care Partners, LLC operates Nova Health and SouthStar Urgent Care clinics serving patients in 60 clinics throughout Oregon, Washington, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and Louisiana.  

 Contact: 
Craig Simmons 
Vice President of Sales and Marketing 
Community Care Partners 
91302 Coburg Industrial Way, Suite 122 
Coburg, OR 97408 
craig.simmons@novahealth.com 

Nova Health to Open New Urgent Care Clinic in Great Falls, Montana

Eugene, OR – September 8, 2021 – Nova Health, a provider of high-quality, convenient primary and urgent care services in the Western United States, will open a new urgent care clinic in Great Falls, Montana, on September 13, 2021. The clinic, which offers same-day, walk-in, and telemedicine services, is located at 609 10th Ave S.

“Our focus remains on rapidly expanding access to convenient, trusted healthcare in the Western United States,” said Nova Health Chief Executive Officer Jim Ashby. “We are committed to our Montana patients and their communities. The opening of our Great Falls clinic represents a critical step in our expansion roadmap.”

Nova Health’s Great Falls clinic represents its fourth in Montana and adds to its available locations in Belgrade, Butte, and Bozeman.

“Nova Health is known for choosing the absolute highest quality healthcare providers,” added Ashby. “Our latest clinic location also means an expansion in the reach and impact of our care team, especially in our continued efforts to mitigate COVID-19-related hospitalizations.”

About Nova Health

Nova Health provides high-quality, convenient, primary and urgent care services. Established in 2008 with one clinic and nine employees, it has grown to 56 clinics nationally, including its sister healthcare provider, SouthStar Urgent Care.

Nova Health to Open New Urgent Care Clinic in McMinnville, Oregon

Eugene, OR – September 1, 2021 – Nova Health, a provider of high-quality, convenient primary and urgent care services in the Western United States, is slated to open a new urgent care clinic in McMinnville, Oregon, on September 9th, 2021. The clinic is located at 1755 SW Baker Street and accepts walk-in and same-day urgent care appointments.

“The opening of our McMinnville clinic represents just one more step in serving Oregon communities,” said Nova Health Chief Executive Officer Jim Ashby. “We are committed to keeping people out of the hospital through obsessing about delivering extraordinary care that is personal.”  Services at McMinnville will include walk-in, same-day, and telemedicine visits.

Ashby adds that Nova Health continues to support the patients in its communities through the COVID-19 pandemic recovery phase.  “I have the greatest faith in our compassionate care team, and I know their new patients soon will, too,” he said. “We look forward to building those strategic patient-provider relationships and continuing our growth plans.”

Nova Health’s McMinnville clinic is its nineteenth clinic in Oregon.

About Nova Health

Nova Health provides high-quality, convenient, primary and urgent care services. Established in 2008 with one clinic and nine employees, it has grown to 56 clinics nationally, including its sister healthcare provider, SouthStar Urgent Care.

What Causes Vertigo and How Can You Tell if You Have it?

For film noir fans, the word vertigo conjures images from the 1958 Alfred Hitchcock film of the same name. The movie stars James Stewart as a private investigator who attempts to follow Kim Novak, despite suffering from trauma-induced acrophobia (a fear of heights) and vertigo (a false sense of rotational movement). To emphasize the condition for which Stewart’s character suffers, Hitchcock used clever camera movements and music that create a visual sense of a spiraling free-fall for the viewer.

For the approximately 40 percent of Americans who will experience vertigo in their lives, Hitchcock’s depiction of the condition is all too real, acting as a reminder of the discomfort of this temporary condition. What causes vertigo, and how can you tell if you have it? Our health experts separate the facts from fiction.

What is Vertigo?

Vertigo is a sensation of feeling off-balance, often more casually referred to as dizzy spells. Those who experience vertigo often report feeling like they are spinning or that the world around them is spinning while they remain still.

What Causes Vertigo?

Perhaps surprisingly, vertigo is often the result of an inner ear problem.  The inner ear sends signals to the brain about head and body movements relative to gravity which help you to keep your balance. When something disrupts the inner ear’s normal processing, it can result in vertigo.

Frequent causes of vertigo may include:

  • Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). This condition occurs when canaliths (tiny calcium particles) are dislodged from their normal location and collect in the inner ear. It can occur for no reason and is sometimes more common with age.
  • Meniere’s disease. An inner ear disorder that is believed to be caused by a buildup of fluid and changing pressure in the ear that can cause episodes of vertigo, hearing loss, or tinnitus (ringing in the ears).
  • Vestibular neuritis (labyrinthitis). An inner ear problem that is usually related to a viral infection. The infection causes inner ear inflammation around nerves that support the body’s sense of balance.

Vertigo may also result from:

  • Migraines
  • A head or neck injury
  • A stroke, tumor, or other brain problems
  • Medications that can cause ear damage

Vertigo Symptoms

Often triggered by a change in head position, symptoms can last a few minutes, a few hours, or come and go intermittently. Symptoms of vertigo often include sensations of:

  • Spinning
  • Tilting
  • Swaying
  • Unbalance
  • Being pulled in one direction
  • Nausea
  • Hearing loss
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Vomiting
  • Nystagmus (abnormal, jerking eye movements)
  • Sweating
  • Headache

What to Do if You Think That You are Experiencing Vertigo?

If you believe you are experiencing vertigo, talk to your doctor. They can determine the underlying condition causing your vertigo sensations and help you reestablish your equilibrium. Depending on the underlying cause of your vertigo, your doctor may prescribe medication, such as dimenhydrinate and meclizine.

August is Psoriasis Action Month, and We Aim to Bring This Condition and Those Living with It Into the Light

No one should feel uncomfortable in their skin, yet for the millions of people living with psoriasis, both the physical discomfort and notable red patches it causes on the skin leave its sufferers feeling insecure and frustrated. Therefore, we recognize Psoriasis Action Month for all those living with this condition. It is a time to elevate awareness and understanding of the condition and encourage those impacted to seek treatment by a medical professional.

What is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a common condition that impacts more than three million Americans and more than 100 million people globally, yet much is still unknown as to the exact cause of this uncomfortable condition. With psoriasis, skin cells build upon themselves, forming itchy, scaly, dry patches. Sometimes, the skin rash also impacts the nails and joints, though red patches most commonly appear on the knees, elbows, trunk, and scalp.

Psoriasis Symptoms include:

  • Red patches of skin covered with thick, silvery scales
  • Dry, cracked skin that may bleed or itch
  • Itching, burning, or soreness
  • Thickened, pitted, or ridged nails
  • Swollen and stiff joints
  • Small scaling spots (most common in children)

Symptom flare-ups can be caused by stress, infections, and cold temperatures. Medical researchers believe that an immune system reaction causes psoriasis. It tends to go through cycles in which symptoms flare for a few weeks or months, then subside or go into remission.

What is Plaque Psoriasis?

The most common type of psoriasis creates dry, raised lesions covered with silvery scales. The plaques might be itchy or tender, typically appearing on elbows, knees, lower back, and scalp.

Is there a Cure for Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a chronic disease with no cure; however, treatments are available to help you manage symptoms. If you are diagnosed with psoriasis, your doctor may prescribe a topical ointment, light therapy, or other medications that aim to remove scales and slow the rapid growth of skin cells.

How to Take Part in National Psoriasis Action Month

Whether you live with Psoriasis or want to be an ally for those whose lifestyles have been impacted by this uncomfortable condition, you can help all month (and year) long. The National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) offers information, education, and resources about the condition for patients and their loved ones.

One of the most significant positive impacts you can have on a psoriasis patient is to treat them with the same acceptance that you treat all those around you. People with psoriasis are often uncomfortable and insecure about how their skin patches appear and fear being judged or defined by a condition they cannot help and may not fully understand. By showing that you are aware of the challenges of psoriasis and are not uncomfortable with their appearance, you will reaffirm the self-confidence they need to lead their life without social insecurities.

Pregnancy and Asthma: How to Keep Yourself and Your Baby Safe

When you’re carrying the newest member of your family (and the world) in your belly, you have a monumental responsibility to keep yourself and your little one safe and healthy. While no research indicates that women can develop asthma as a direct result of being pregnant, if you have asthma, you could find your symptoms worsening during your pregnancy. Ensure your OBGYN knows about your history with asthma and how you currently manage your condition so that they can provide you with additional guidance during your pregnancy. What follows are answers to some of the most common questions that pregnant mothers ask about the complications of their asthma during their pregnancy.

Does Asthma Worsen During Pregnancy?

Every woman is different. Some report worsening asthma symptoms, some report no change, and others report their symptoms improving. Monitor your symptoms closely and report any worsening to your doctor promptly.

Can Pregnant Mothers Use Asthma Medications?

Your doctor will provide you with guidance on the medications and other treatment options that you can use during your pregnancy. Most asthma medicines are generally safe during pregnancy. However, your doctor will likely tell you not to take sulfonamides during your last trimester to avoid your baby being born with jaundice. Your doctor will also likely tell you not to take any tetracyclines during your pregnancy, as they could cause skeletal or dental deformities in your baby.

Do not immediately stop taking your asthma medication when you learn you are pregnant. Talk to your doctor. An abrupt change in your medication regimen could put you and your baby at risk of a severe asthma attack.

Is it Common to Experience a Severe Asthma Attack During Delivery?

Surprisingly, asthma often improves during labor and delivery. However, if you experience an asthma attack and are delivering your baby in a hospital, your doctor and health care team will be well-prepared to address your symptoms.

Can a Mother Pass Asthma to Her Baby?

Asthma is often inherited. Therefore, if a mother or father has asthma, their child is more likely to have it than a child whose parents do not have asthma; however, it is not guaranteed that the child of a mother with asthma will certainly have the condition.

What are the Risks to a Baby Whose Mother is Pregnant?

A mother is her baby’s lifeline in every possible way. Your baby will depend on you to supply oxygen during their development, which your baby will need for survival. If your asthma is uncontrolled and you experience a dangerous decrease in oxygen, so does your baby, which could result in impaired growth or other health complications.

If you experience severe asthma, your condition may put your baby in danger. Talk to your doctor to ensure you are taking every step to control your asthma during your pregnancy.

August 1 is World Lung Cancer Day, So Show Your Lungs Some Love

The average person breathes in and out 22,000 per day. Twenty-two thousand times each day, your lungs complete a critical, life-sustaining function, and most of the time, it happens without you even noticing it. For this and so many reasons, every August 1, we celebrate World Lung Cancer Day. It is a time to reflect on the vital role of our lungs and commit to making the kind of lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of lung cancer, an often preventable form of cancer. So this year, take a deep breath and give thanks for your ability to do so. If you are one of the millions of people struggling to quit smoking, talk to your doctor or contact the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Smoking Cessation program at 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669).

The Truth About Lung Cancer

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimates that 38.5 percent of people will be diagnosed with cancer during their lifetime. Lung cancer is one of the most common types of cancer and contributes to the most cancer deaths. Fortunately, it is also among the most preventable.

Types of Lung Cancer

There are two primary forms of lung cancer:

  • Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This type of lung cancer represents 80 to 85 percent of lung cancers. NSCLC represents three subtypes of lung cancer with similar outlooks and treatment options. The subtypes include adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell carcinoma.
    • This form of lung cancer forms in the cells that would normally secrete mucus and other substances. It occurs mainly in current or former smokers. Fortunately, it is also most likely to be identified before it spreads to other parts of the body.
    • Squamous cell carcinoma. This subtype is often linked to a history of smoking and typically forms in the central part of the lungs.
    • Large cell carcinoma. This subtype can appear in any part of the lungs and can grow and spread rapidly.
  • Small cell lung cancer (SCLC). This type of lung cancer tends to grow and spread quicker than NSCLC. Unfortunately, in 70 percent of SCLC cases, the cancer will already have spread before a diagnosis is made.

Causes of Lung Cancer

The most significant risk factor for lung cancer is smoking. The length and frequency with which a person smokes can increase the risk of developing lung cancer. In addition, individuals who have never smoked but have been exposed to regular second-hand smoke or other toxins can be at risk of lung cancer.

Lung Cancer Symptoms

Most lung cancer symptoms are respiratory. The most common indicators include:

  • The development of a persistent cough
  • Coughing up small amounts of blood
  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Hoarseness
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Bone pain
  • Headache

How to Find Smoking Cessation Support

The most critical step that you can take to reduce your chance of developing lung cancer is to quit smoking or help those around you quit if you are regularly exposed to second-hand smoke. If you need to quit smoking but have struggled to quit in the past, talk to your doctor. They will be your greatest advocate and help identify the most effective treatment plan depending on your symptoms, history, other health complications, and lifestyle factors. If you’ve been waiting for a powerful impetus to take the first step toward a smoke-free lifestyle, look no further than World Lung Cancer Day. In honor of the 154,050 Americans who will lose their lives this year due to lung cancer, commit to getting help today.

August 1 is World Lung Cancer Day, So Show Your Lungs Some Love

The average person breathes in and out 22,000 per day. Twenty-two thousand times each day, your lungs complete a critical, life-sustaining function, and most of the time, it happens without you even noticing it. For this and so many reasons, every August 1, we celebrate World Lung Cancer Day. It is a time to reflect on the vital role of our lungs and commit to making the kind of lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of lung cancer, an often preventable form of cancer. So this year, take a deep breath and give thanks for your ability to do so. If you are one of the millions of people struggling to quit smoking, talk to your doctor or contact the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Smoking Cessation program at 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669).

The Truth About Lung Cancer

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimates that 38.5 percent of people will be diagnosed with cancer during their lifetime. Lung cancer is one of the most common types of cancer and contributes to the most cancer deaths. Fortunately, it is also among the most preventable.

Types of Lung Cancer

There are two primary forms of lung cancer:

  • Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This type of lung cancer represents 80 to 85 percent of lung cancers. NSCLC represents three subtypes of lung cancer with similar outlooks and treatment options. The subtypes include adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell carcinoma.
    • This form of lung cancer forms in the cells that would normally secrete mucus and other substances. It occurs mainly in current or former smokers. Fortunately, it is also most likely to be identified before it spreads to other parts of the body.
    • Squamous cell carcinoma. This subtype is often linked to a history of smoking and typically forms in the central part of the lungs.
    • Large cell carcinoma. This subtype can appear in any part of the lungs and can grow and spread rapidly.
  • Small cell lung cancer (SCLC). This type of lung cancer tends to grow and spread quicker than NSCLC. Unfortunately, in 70 percent of SCLC cases, the cancer will already have spread before a diagnosis is made.

Causes of Lung Cancer

The most significant risk factor for lung cancer is smoking. The length and frequency with which a person smokes can increase the risk of developing lung cancer. In addition, individuals who have never smoked but have been exposed to regular second-hand smoke or other toxins can be at risk of lung cancer.

Lung Cancer Symptoms

Most lung cancer symptoms are respiratory. The most common indicators include:

  • The development of a persistent cough
  • Coughing up small amounts of blood
  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Hoarseness
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Bone pain
  • Headache

How to Find Smoking Cessation Support

The most critical step that you can take to reduce your chance of developing lung cancer is to quit smoking or help those around you quit if you are regularly exposed to second-hand smoke. If you need to quit smoking but have struggled to quit in the past, talk to your doctor. They will be your greatest advocate and help identify the most effective treatment plan depending on your symptoms, history, other health complications, and lifestyle factors. If you’ve been waiting for a powerful impetus to take the first step toward a smoke-free lifestyle, look no further than World Lung Cancer Day. In honor of the 154,050 Americans who will lose their lives this year due to lung cancer, commit to getting help today.

It’s One of the Rarest Forms of Cancer, but Could You be at Risk of Sarcoma?

Cancer, and all of the fears and worries it carries, comes in many forms, sarcoma being one of the most dangerous, albeit one of the rarest, accounting for only one percent of all adult cancer cases. Sarcoma is a type of cancer that forms in the bones or soft tissues. It can develop in the muscles, fat cells, or nerves, meaning that it can occur in any part of the body. Doctors identify around 17,000 new sarcoma diagnoses each year. So what are the risk factors for this dangerous condition, and are there steps you can take to minimize your chances of a diagnosis during your lifetime? Read on to find out.

Who is at Risk for Sarcoma?

While sarcoma is rare in adults, it represents around 15 percent of all childhood cancer cases. Researchers have identified a few factors that could increase one’s risk of a sarcoma diagnosis, which are:

  • Cancer radiation treatment, which accounts for less than five percent of sarcoma cases, and often does not develop until about ten years after an affected area was treated with radiation
  • A damaged lymph system, possibly as the result of radiation therapy, can cause swelling (lymphedema) that in rare cases, in turn, can cause lymphangiosarcoma, a tumor in the lymph vessels
  • Chemical exposure, particularly vinyl chloride (a chemical used in making plastics), arsenic, dioxin, and herbicides containing high doses of phenoxyacetic acid
  • Some family cancer syndromes that are caused by gene mutations, including:
    • Gardner syndrome, a disease that can cause colon and intestinal polyps
    • Neurofibromatosis (von Recklinghausen disease), a condition that can cause benign tumors in nerves under the skin and other body parts
    • Retinoblastoma, a type of childhood eye cancer
    • Werner syndrome, which creates health complications in children typically only experienced by seniors, such as cataracts, arteriosclerosis, and skin changes
    • Li-Fraumeni syndrome, which leaves its patients sensitive to the cancer-causing effects of radiation
    • Tuberous sclerosis, which can cause seizures and learning problems in addition to increasing one’s risk of sarcoma
    • Gorlin syndrome (nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome [NBCCS]), which increases one’s risk of developing basal cell skin cancers, fibrosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma

What are the Symptoms of Sarcoma?

Symptoms of sarcoma vary, depending on where it develops, but may include:

  • A lump that can be felt through the skin, which may or may not be painful
  • Bone pain
  • Abdominal pain
  • An unexpected broken bone, seemingly without a serious injury
  • Weight loss

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, particularly if you know you have any of the risk factors above, such as the noted genetic conditions, talk to your doctor. They can conduct the necessary testing and screening procedures to determine the cause of your discomfort. As with all cancers, early detection is critical for effective treatment, so never hesitate to talk to your doctor if you have any health concerns.

Four Ways to Protect Your Eyes During Healthy Vision Month

Most of us cannot conceive of a life without appreciating the beauty in every blade of grass or every child’s smile. However, around 12 million Americans 40 years and over have vision impairment, including one million who are blind. This July, we recognize Healthy Vision Month. It is a time to understand better the risks associated with vision loss, the ways that we can support the vision impaired, and recommit to making healthy lifestyle choices to protect our eye health. This summer, when the sun is at its highest and strongest peak of the year, spend a few minutes familiarizing yourself with the risk factors that can put your healthy vision at risk. Then, pledge to yourself to prioritize your long-term eye health this month and always.

1. Commit to an Annual Eye Exam

You prioritize seeing your physician annually for a wellness exam and routine screening (or you should; if you don’t already have a primary care physician, find one here). However, you should also make an annual visit to your eye doctor another healthcare priority. Your doctor can screen for eye disease and other risk factors that could impair your vision long-term during your eye exam.

2. Encourage Your Family and Friends to Obtain an Annual Eye Exam Too

Not only is Healthy Vision Month a time to prioritize your eye health, but it is also a time to strengthen your advocacy for the eye health of those you love and care for. Encourage your parents, friends, and other family members to obtain an annual eye exam. If you are a parent, talk to your pediatrician about a recommended cadence for eye exams for your child. Typically, however, children should have their first eye exam at six months, then at age three, and then again before they begin first grade.

3. Give Your Eyes a Rest from Digital Devices

The blue lights that your smartphone, laptop, and tablet emit can cause eye strain, especially for individuals (including teenagers) who work at a computer or spend significant time each day on their smartphones. To minimize your exposure to blue light and your risk of eye strain, follow the 20-20-20 rule. Every 20 minutes, look away from your computer at a point about 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds. Pair this with a stand, water, or meditation break for double the wellness.

4. Wear Sunglasses with UV Protection

Wearing sunglasses every season when you are outdoors during the day is a critical step to protecting your eyes. Ensure your sunglasses are designed to protect you from both UV-A and UV-B rays. Sunglasses do not need to be expensive, prescription, or designer to include UV protection, but you want to ensure you choose a pair with this feature for optimal impact.

Commit to Recognizing Healthy Vision Month Every Month

Think of Healthy Vision Month as a time to recommit to eye health best practices, but don’t let up the rest of the year. The long-term effects of sun exposure, eye strain, and neglecting regular eye screenings can be detrimental to your long-term eye health. With a few proactive but consistent lifestyle changes, you’ll be enjoying the beauty of nature’s details and your loved ones’ smiles all the days of your long, healthy life.

Diagnosed with Pre-Diabetes? Nine Things You Can Do to Reduce Your Risk Factors

Here in the United States, 34.2 million Americans—just over one in 10—have diabetes, and another 88 million—approximately one in three—have prediabetes. These staggering numbers remind us that diabetes is a prevalent health crisis in our country and often preventable with proper awareness, education, and lifestyle choices. However, if your doctor has recently diagnosed you as pre-diabetic, that doesn’t necessarily mean that a future as a person with diabetes is imminent. The following nine health choices will mitigate your risk of developing diabetes and the health complications it can carry.

1. Eat Healthily

A critical change that you can make to lower your risk of diabetes is to make healthier eating choices. A five to ten percent weight reduction can significantly lower your risk of developing diabetes. Swap processed carbs for whole grains and starches, such as potatoes, white bread, and sugary breakfast cereals.

2. Get Active

Aim for at least 30 minutes of activity per day, five days per week. Such activity can further help you manage your weight and can strengthen your heart and lungs. Talk to your doctor before you begin any new fitness routine or exercise program.

3. Manage Your Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

High blood pressure and unhealthy cholesterol levels are risk factors for several health risks, including heart attack, stroke, and diabetes. A healthy diet paired with an active lifestyle can help. So can your doctor.

4. If You Smoke, Quit

Smoking can increase your risk of diabetes. If you need help quitting, talk to your doctor, or visit smokefree.gov to access education, programs, and resources.