Nova Health Brings Urgent Care Services to West Eugene

Nova Health West Eugene Location

Local Provider Nova Health Brings Urgent Care Services to West Eugene

The long-standing community partner in wellness hosts ribbon cutting and blood drive with Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

Nova Health, a comprehensive provider of quality urgent care, primary care, physical therapy, and musculoskeletal services in Lane and Douglas Counties, announces today the opening of its newest urgent care clinic in West Eugene.

The Nova Health Urgent Care – West 11th clinic offers immediate access to care seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. This clinic represents Nova Health’s mission to provide more access points for immediate healthcare in the Eugene community. Nova Health has five additional facilities in the Eugene Springfield area providing urgent care, primary care, and physical therapy services. Across Lane and Douglas counties, Nova Health is equipped to serve Western Oregon healthcare consumers with quality, patient-focused care in its 15 clinic facilities offering an umbrella of services.

“It is critically important to Nova Health that we continue to build our provider network to provide more access points and support rural and underserved communities with necessary medical services,” said Bill Clendenen, Nova Health Chief Executive Officer. “Eugene is where our story began, and it is rewarding to extend our urgent care resources into West Eugene.”

Nova Health and Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce will host a blood drive, ribbon cutting and open house for the West Eugene community to celebrate the clinic’s opening and continued care practices. Everyone who attends the event will be entered to win a Nova Health gift basket. Details below:

WHAT:

Nova Health – West 11th Ribbon Cutting and Blood Drive

WHEN:

January 22, 2020
Bloodworks Northwest Blood Drive from 3 to 6 PM
Ribbon Cutting and Open House from 6 to 7:30 PM 

WHERE:

Nova Urgent Care – West 11th
4040 West 11th Avenue, Eugene
RSVP here on the Nova Health Facebook page

WHO:

Richard Abraham, MD,
Founder and Jeff Myers, Chief of Staff Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce

VISUALS:

Community members donating blood and clinic tour

WHY:

Recent studies show that young people (ages 18-34) are increasingly relying on “immediate care” services in non-emergency situations including urgent care clinics compared to older generations. Nova Health understands the need for immediate access to medical care is more and more prevalent and is therefore committed to providing such services and options for patients to receive affordable and consistent healthcare.

About Nova Health

Celebrating over ten years of serving patients throughout Lane and Douglas Counties, Nova Health is an outpatient healthcare organization that provides urgent care, primary care, physical therapy services, and musculoskeletal clinic services. Our focus is on providing high-quality patient care to the neighborhoods and communities we serve. Nova Health is a growing company that was established in 2008 with one clinic and nine employees and has grown to 14 clinics all within the Eugene, Springfield, Junction City, Veneta, Oakridge, Cottage Grove, Florence, and Roseburg areas. For more information, please visit novahealth.com.

 

Media Contact:
Kristine Rice
541-870-3726
krice@novahealth.com

National Blood Donor Month—Easing Your Fears to Earn Your Donation

January is Blood Drive Month

Few of us get an opportunity to be a genuine hero. While police officers, doctors, and firefighters regularly earn the title “savior,” most of us, fortunately, don’t find ourselves in positions where life and death are on the line. However, there is one easy way to become a hero and to save not just one life, but as many as three, and to do it over and over, multiplying the impact of your generous actions—and all it takes is one pint of blood.

January is National Blood Donation Month, a time for all those who can to resolve at the start of the new year to become a regular blood donor. If you’ve thought about donating blood in the past, but have found yourself stacking reasons why you can’t, or shouldn’t give blood, we’ve compiled answers to your questions and solutions to your concerns so that this January, you can become a hero too.

I Don’t Like Needles.

It would be rare to hear someone say that they enjoy the temporary discomfort that comes with a needle stick. Understand that the minor sting and discomfort that you will feel when the needle is inserted is minimal compared to the pain of someone who needs regular blood transfusions due to life-threatening conditions such as cancer, liver disease, or sickle cell anemia. Even if you have Trypanophobia, a severe fear of needles that affects 20 percent of people, a blood draw staff member can make the experience as comfortable and reassuring for you as possible if you are honest and upfront about your concerns.

My One Donation Won’t Make an Impact.

Every single pint of donated blood makes a difference. Every three seconds, someone needs blood. As a result, 32,000 pints of blood are used daily in the U.S. alone. Since whole blood only has a shelf-life of 42 days, and platelets only have a shelf-life of five days, the constant need to bolster our blood banks is ongoing.

Donating Blood Will Put Me at Risk of Contracting a Deadly Infection or Disease, like HIV.

Donating blood with a reputable service provider such as the Amerian Red Cross is safe. New, sterile, disposable equipment is used for each donor, eliminating the risk of contamination and of contracting a disease such as HIV.

I’ll Pass Out.

Every precaution is taken during blood donations to minimize discomfort and adverse side effects for donors. As part of the donor screening process, your blood iron levels will be checked, and you will be asked to verify that you meet height and weight requirements. Donors who do feel light-headed during or after a donation are cared for closely by donation staff. Typically, a few extra minutes of laying down and rehydrating is enough to end any feelings of lightheadedness. Keep in mind that the average person has ten pints of blood in their body, and a whole blood donation only takes one, which most people replenish within a few hours.

Final Words of Encouragement

More than one million people are diagnosed with cancer each year, and many will need blood—possibly daily—during chemotherapy treatments. The simple act of donating blood takes less than an hour, involves minimal discomfort, and can save as many as three lives, turning everyday good samaritans into genuine heroes. To make a blood donation appointment with the American Red Cross today, click here.